The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog – Volume 10 Issue 14 – Trailing Leg

April 22, 2018

The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog

Sharpening Referee Knowledge and Judgment, One Week at a Time

Volume 10, Issue 14, April 22, 2018

Forward this to a Fellow Soccer Ref!

Please feel free to forward this Blog to your fellow soccer officials or tell them about it.

The purpose of this Blog is so we can all learn from each other’s experience and by doing so, avoid mistakes, make more consistent calls, and do a better job. I don’t have to make any of this up – this is what happens on the pitch.

Quote of the Week

“There was no Advantage there!

From the coach at DeKalb, after the referee allowed Advantage when a DeKalb player was fouled, but another was running into their opponent’s end, parallel to the ball, about a yard away from the ball and approaching the opponent’s 18.

If that isn’t Advantage, what is?

Weather or Not

This has been the season of cancelled games.  I have had more cancelled games due to weather than in at least 6 previous seasons combined.

It’s been hard – you get a game cancelled on Tuesday, and it gets scheduled either over another game you are already committed to, or on another day that you can’t make.  I have already had a game cancelled this week on Monday – small wonder with the snow.  I wonder how the Puma Cup went last weekend in Rockford?  Yep – Cancelled!

I can’t imagine how the assignors are keeping up.

This Week’s Question – Trailing Leg

During a recent Class 1A game…

The two teams here were not well-matched, with the visitor having a far more trained and strong offense and defense.

The game went into the Mercy Rule with a 9 point differential at the half.  Team B has the ball, with B27 bringing the ball to the forward towards Team A’s penalty area.

Just past the mid-field line, you see A2 make a slide tackle, making first contact with the ball.  As the ball flies away, you see A2’s trailing leg (which was not tucked) make contact with B27’s legs, taking B27 to the ground.

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What is the restart?

Last Week’s Question – Behind Your Back

During a recent Class 1A game…

The two teams here were not well-matched here, with the visitor having a far more trained and strong offense and defense.

The game has just gone into the Mercy Rule with a 7 point differential.  The stadium clock however, is not cooperating, and you have noticed that while it should say 3:15 and counting down, it has reset to 7 minutes 3 times already and is not working anymore.

Team B has the ball, with B11 bringing the ball to the southeast side of the field, between the touchline and Team A’s Penalty Area, when you hear the spectators start to complain.

It’s a 3 referee game, so you look to AR1, who is even with the second to last defender.  You give a quick look over your shoulder, see nothing, and with the game winding out the last of the seconds, you blow the whistle.

The parents are griping loudly now, so you approach AR2 who was in trail, and ask him what he saw.

AR2 reports A9 gave a “violent push” to B11, and that B11 “swung” at A9.  Since you didn’t see the action, you ask him what card he thinks is warranted, and the AR responds that both should be Red Carded.

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What is the restart?

What You Said:

Referee 1:

Violent Conduct for both. Show the red card to both. Pretty easy here. Anyone who doesn’t deal with this will quickly see the game deteriorate and spiral out of control to a point you will never be able to get back to. Don’t let that happen in your games. Trust your ARs!

Referee 2:

It happened before you blew the whistle for time, so go with your AR who saw the foul play, and issue the cards.

That way your ARs realize that you respect their calls, and the coaches also realize that there are three referees out there, not just the center.

Referee 3:

I had almost exactly this happen in a Girls Varsity game a few years ago.

The push and retaliatory swing occurred behind my back within seconds of the first half ending.

The AR on that side reported everything to me. Since the action occurred before the half ended but was not acted on until time ran out, both players got red cards and were not replaced at the second half kickoff.

Referee 4:

Your authority as the match referee continues until you leave the area. The AR did what they were supposed to do and watched the center’s back. Since the center did not see the push or the retaliation and has already consulted with my AR, go with the ARs recommendation. The only question is: Did the offense occur during play or after the whistle was blown.

Approach both coaches and inform them the players are receiving red cards. Show the players the card and make sure you get the players names and numbers. Write it up in your game report.

Referee 5:

Here’s a case of depending on your team.

Red cards for both….one for the push and one for the “swinging” at the to other player, contact doesn’t have to be made if the act was prevalent.

I always double check with my team to be sure.

Referee 6:

Violent push and a swing with intent to hit a player; both are red cards. You could do a DFK for Team B or due to the nature of the fouls a drop ball for restart.

Another answer is considering the time left and the score, red card both and end the game. Before anything else happens.

The Answer:

It was outside of your sight – so what?

You aren’t using Club Lineman or (perish the thought) a parent or extra player.  You have a trained official, who took the same test you did.

If they call it Violent Conduct – they saw it and you didn’t.  Go with it.

Eject the two players, file the necessary Special Reports, and make this right.

Depending on where the game is, this could be the time to TERMINATE the match, and file a Special Report.  Take a moment to look at the player’s faces.  Do they shown signs of anger (frowns, fists clenched)?  Any signs, TERMINATE and file the Special Report.  If you see signs of anger, it will likely boil out in a few moments, and you’ll be doing MORE Red Cards.  Or Worse – trying to get control of an All-Out Melee!

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The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog – Volume 10 Issue 13 – Behind Your Back

April 15, 2018

The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog

Sharpening Referee Knowledge and Judgment, One Week at a Time

Volume 10, Issue 13, April 15, 2018

Forward this to a Fellow Soccer Ref!

Please feel free to forward this Blog to your fellow soccer officials or tell them about it.

The purpose of this Blog is so we can all learn from each other’s experience and by doing so, avoid mistakes, make more consistent calls, and do a better job. I don’t have to make any of this up – this is what happens on the pitch.

Quote of the Week

“That was perfectly called – the player was offsides, and came back on to play the ball.  Good offside call.

From an English Premier League game, (the same one from last week’s Blog where they praised the officials) after a no-brainer offside call.

Missed a Week

I was wondering why it was so quiet.

It appears that I missed getting the blog out last week.  In my defense, I spent 9 hours cleaning out a house, working on the top floor only, and filling 20 44 gallon bags with trash.  By the time I got home, I was exhausted and it was late, and I just blew it.  Sorry.

Assignor’s Month of Hell

In case you haven’t noticed (and if you haven’t noticed, you aren’t reffing right now), the assignors in Illinois are getting hammered by the weather.

Games are being cancelled, rescheduled, and re-arranged at the last minute.  One assignor went to run errands for 90 minutes, and had 35 emails by the time he got back home.

So, while the weather is messing with our schedules, let’s take a step back, and consider those people who have to make those schedules.  Let’s do what we can to not ADD to the chaos that Mother Nature is providing to us and the assignors.

Please try to honor your assignment commitments.  The players are depending on us.  Be flexible, look for ways to help the assignors and you both win.

We’re all in this together.

This Week’s Question – Behind Your Back

During a recent Class 1A game…

The two teams here were not well-matched here, with the visitor having a far more trained and strong offense and defense.

The game has just gone into the Mercy Rule with a 7 point differential.  The stadium clock however, is not cooperating, and you have noticed that while it should say 3:15 and counting down, it has reset to 7 minutes 3 times already and is not working anymore.

Team B has the ball, with B11 bringing the ball to the southeast side of the field, between the touchline and Team A’s Penalty Area, when you hear the spectators start to complain.

It’s a 3 referee game, so you look to AR1, who is even with the second to last defender.  You give a quick look over your shoulder, see nothing, and with the game winding out the last of the seconds, you blow the whistle.

The parents are griping loudly now, so you approach AR2 who was in trail, and ask him what he saw.

AR2 reports A9 gave a “violent push” to B11, and that B11 “swung” at A9.  Since you didn’t see the action, you ask him what card he thinks is warranted, and the AR responds that both should be Red Carded.

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What is the restart?

Last Week’s Question – No Deflection There

During a recent JV Class 1A game…

The two teams here are well-matched with 1A JV talent on display.

Team A has driven the ball to the goal mouth of Team B, and a weak shot was taken.  A9 and A4 are just outside the goal area line, with B13 and B00 (goalkeeper between them and the goal.

The shot was controlled by B13 (not the goalkeeper), who stopped the ball, looked up, and then kicked the directly back to A4, who receives the ball with a shocked look on her face, then kicks it into the Team B goal.

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What is the restart?

What You Said:

Referee 1:

A4 received the ball from a defender, so it’s a goal. Result = Kick Off.

Referee 2:

A player in an offside position is not guilty of an offside infraction if they receive the ball directly from a defender.

From the description, it is unclear if A4 was in an offside position or not. Either way, the result is a goal. Restart with a kickoff.

The Answer:

This one was weird.  The ball went to B13 who controlled the ball they stopped it, and then passed the ball directly back to A4, who smiling at her fortune, shot it into Team B’s goal.

Both Team A players were further from the goal than the ball.

So, no Offside here, and good goal.

The restart would be a kickoff from this play.

The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog – Volume 10 Issue 12 – No Deflection There

April 1, 2018

The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog

Sharpening Referee Knowledge and Judgment, One Week at a Time

Volume 10, Issue 12, April 1, 2018

Forward this to a Fellow Soccer Ref!

Please feel free to forward this Blog to your fellow soccer officials or tell them about it.

The purpose of this Blog is so we can all learn from each other’s experience and by doing so, avoid mistakes, make more consistent calls, and do a better job. I don’t have to make any of this up – this is what happens on the pitch.

Quote of the Week

“That was a well-refed game! You guys were on top of every foul.  All I could do is stand and watch in wonder!”

April Fools!

Bonus Quote (this one just knocked me over)

“That was a dive, and the referee called it well. This referee is doing really well today, and you don’t hear me say that often.”

From an English Premier League game, where the referee correctly cautioned the Keeper of one team for a Reckless challenge, and then incorrectly (in my opinion), cautioned a player from the other team for diving, when the video replay (which was replayed 6 times) clearly showed he got tripped by the opponent who tackled the ball.

We SO NEED video replay in Soccer – NOW.

This Week’s Question – No Deflection There

During a recent JV Class 1A game…

The two teams here are well-matched with 1A JV talent on display.

Team A has driven the ball to the goal mouth of Team B, and a weak shot was taken.  A9 and A4 are just outside the goal area line, with B13 and B00 (goalkeeper between them and the goal.

The shot was controlled by B13 (not the goalkeeper), who stopped the ball, looked up, and then kicked the directly back to A4, who receives the ball with a shocked look on her face, then kicks it into the Team B goal.

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What is the restart?

Last Week’s Question – Arm Bars

During a recent tournament game…

The two teams here are well-matched with 1A talent on display.

You see B6 with the ball, as A17 comes to her side to make a fair charge for the ball.

As A17 comes in, you see B6’s right arm come up, and make contact with A17.  At the same time, you see A17’s left arm come up, and make contact with B6.

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What is the restart?

What You Said:

Referee 1:

Let’s wait and see who pushes more!

Loser of the push with elbows game gets the ball for DFK.

Referee 2:

No call as they are both acting at the same time and neither gained advantage by the holds. Let them play but talk to them so when you have to call it later it is no surprise.

Referee 3:

From what is said it raises the “you had to see it” scenario. This is a contact sport. The contact sounds like what is seen every day in games. If it remains constant, and with both players exerting the same amount of “force” my inclination is to let it continue and see what develops.

If one escalates the force or the other disengages that may lead to a call. On the other hand if you feel you absolutely need to blow the whistle, whistle the person who started it, not the one who reacted. IMHO

Referee 4:

The player with the ball has the advantage, it’s up to the defender to dispossess her in a fair manner (shoulder to shoulder, one foot on the ground, etc.).

In this case, wait for developments. B6 might get a shot off, or this might progress to foul play.

Since this is a tournament, don’t be in a rush to turn trifling into fouls. Contact is expected; but make it fair contact.

Referee 5:

When a player is going to make a shoulder to shoulder tackle over the ball, it’s natural for the forearm to come up in a horizontal defensive position. In this case both players have raised their arms. There’s no indication the arms were extended and either player was pushed off the ball.

No foul. Continue play. Stay close behind and let the players compete.

Referee 6:

So an arm came up, possibly in self-defense. This is a full-contact sport Unless there was a punch or some sort of strike, let them play. Give them a loud “Keep the arms down please” and let the game progress. No foul, no restart

Referee 7:

Contact does not mean a foul, continue to monitor the play for the one that exceeds the acceptable level of play that’s been displayed during the game.

The Answer:

So, we have offsetting fouls at this point – both are kind of holding each other.  Wait a minute – isn’t that trifling or doubtful?  Yep.

You have 3 choices.

Technically, B17 made the first move, so you could whistle the foul and provide the DFK to Team A.

You could let it go, and see what happens.  Depending on what is happening, this could be “in the opinion of the referee…” trifling.

You could technically stop play, tell the players to keep their arms down, and start with a dropped ball.  Then you could tell all the players this isn’t acceptable.  Wait – that’s the coaches job.  That wouldn’t make you popular with many people.

Unfortunately, you see this in Girls league play a lot, and the lower in U level you go, the worse it gets.

Watch and see what you get.  Don’t be quick to whistle.

The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog – Volume 10 Issue 11 – Arm Bars

March 25, 2018

The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog

Sharpening Referee Knowledge and Judgment, One Week at a Time

Volume 10, Issue 11, March 25, 2018

Forward this to a Fellow Soccer Ref!

Please feel free to forward this Blog to your fellow soccer officials or tell them about it.

The purpose of this Blog is so we can all learn from each other’s experience and by doing so, avoid mistakes, make more consistent calls, and do a better job. I don’t have to make any of this up – this is what happens on the pitch.

Quote of the Week

“Push, sir.”

From a coach on a game yesterday.  It was a push, but it was trifling.

It’s Game Time!

The Spring Soccer Season has started in Illinois.  My first games were yesterday!  The year is already getting more wacky quotes and situations!

This Week’s Question – Arm Bars

During a recent tournament game…

The two teams here are well-matched with 1A talent on display.

You see B6 with the ball, as A17 comes to her side to make a fair charge for the ball.

As A17 comes in, you see B6’s right arm come up, and make contact with A17.  At the same time, you see A17’s left arm come up, and make contact with B6.

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What is the restart?

Last Week’s Question – Better Look

During a tournament game…

The two teams here are well-matched, and a little light on experience as noted by the passes that go to their opponents.

There is a mess near AR1’s position, where A2 and A4 are working the ball with B3 nearby, when A2 pushes A4 down and moves the ball ahead.

The Center (some 40 yards away, while the AR is standing within 3 yards) whistles a foul against Team B.

You are the AR and clearly say A2 push A4 down.

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What is the restart?

What You Said:

Referee 1:

AR holds up flag to signal to Referee that he has information. A smart referee listens to his AR, who is right on top of things.

Admit that you got it wrong, and go with the restart.

I’d go with an IFK to Team A.

Referee 2:

Oh my… the bane of all good ARs: you give great information to the center who still decides otherwise and in opposite to the information you gave.

Two things remain: a) realize you did everything you should and the matter is out of your hands; and b) remain from that point on verbally and physically neutral regarding that call

Then continue the game, keeping your focus and your accuracy.

Looks like Team A gets benefit of an ignored misconduct and also gains the DFK. Ugh.

Referee 3:

Next week’s question is great. It might be best to discus this at the next clinic

I’m glad you made it AR1 as well. Depending on the center this might be a lose-lose situation.

We all have worked with some centers where you never question any ruling they made. Also being on the side with the coaches you know you will catch an earful every time you get near the center line. I know it shouldn’t matter, but what you do probably depends more on your relationship with the center then the laws of the game.

Referee 4:

This is where the AR needs to step up. There was no foul. Assuming the center accepts the ARs’ view of the situation, this is an inadvertent whistle Restart is a dropped ball.

The Answer:

When we work in the two or three referee system, we are a Team.

We work together to help each other.

In this case, the Center has made a bad call – they were screened by play, and perhaps thought you weren’t looking.  The coaches saw what happened, and are already howling.

So, fix this.

Raise your flag, cover your patch, and get the Center’s attention before this restarts.  Don’t fix this with a cross-field shout (YO!  X – YOU GOOFED!) – instead I would advocate that you be subtle – go and talk quietly away from the players.

Since this is a referee error, politely explain what you saw, and suggest the right restart.  This can’t be a penal foul – it wasn’t against an opponent, so the best you can do is say “It’s an error” and drop the ball, unless the rules / laws under which you are playing allow / require an Indirect Free Kick to the team in possession in such cases.

Now, what do you do with the Center is who is a self-centered, arrogant jerk, who says “I don’t want you help – I’ll make the calls, you can help on offside.”?  I say Raise the Flag and Do Your Job.  It’s what you’re paid to do.

If you explain to the Center and he does something different – so be it – you are there to assist, not insist.  The coaches of both teams will have seen your efforts, and perhaps will spare you some of the brunt of the abuse from this goof up, should the Center elect to go his own way.

I’d suggest you note the name of the Center and do both yourself and them a favor – decline assignments with them in the future.  If they don’t want your assistance, don’t work with them.  When enough of us stand up to the arrogant jerks by not working with them, the Assignors will eventually notice (“Why do the ARs assigned to X’s games keep chopping when I assign them?”) and perhaps then the right feedback (the Assignor controls which games they get, and can cut them back) will reach them to change their behavior.

We work as a Team.  We Succeed as a Team.  We Fail as a Team.  There is No “I” in Referee or Center, either literally or figuratively.

The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog – Volume 10 Issue 10 – A Better Look

March 18, 2018

The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog

Sharpening Referee Knowledge and Judgment, One Week at a Time

Volume 10, Issue 11, March 18, 2018

Forward this to a Fellow Soccer Ref!

Please feel free to forward this Blog to your fellow soccer officials or tell them about it.

The purpose of this Blog is so we can all learn from each other’s experience and by doing so, avoid mistakes, make more consistent calls, and do a better job. I don’t have to make any of this up – this is what happens on the pitch.

Quote of the Week

“It was a clear foul when he pushed off his opponent there – the referee team must not have seen it.”

Said by the color commentators on a game where a clear foul was caught on TV, but was missed by the referee team.  We so need to start with the video official in soccer.  The high level game is beyond the referee team’s ability to see.

It’s Game Time!

The Spring Soccer Season is starting in Illinois.  My first games were yesterday!  The year is already getting more wacky quotes and situations!

This Week’s Question – Better Look

During a tournament game…

The two teams here are well-matched, and a little light on experience as noted by the passes that go to their opponents.

There is a mess near AR1’s position, where A2 and A4 are working the ball with B3 nearby, when A2 pushes A4 down and moves the ball ahead.

The Center (some 40 yards away, while the AR is standing within 3 yards) whistles a foul against Team B.

You are the AR and clearly say A2 push A4 down.

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What is the restart?

Last Week’s Question – A Little Help from My Opponent

During a recent game…

This is in the early minutes of a very fast paced game between two skilled teams.  You see B25 at mid-field, near A14 when the ball gets kicked towards Team A’s goal by another player, half a field away.

You see B25 launch off of A14 using his arms and go after the ball, leaving A14 on the ground afterwards.

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What is the restart?

What You Said:

Referee 1:

The player pushed another player (to gain an advantage.) This is (hopefully) just a push and not SFP. Blow the whistle, restart with an IDFK for team A.

Referee 2:

How about pushing, and a DFK to Team A?

Referee 3:

We have a foul at the point of the push and possibly a caution depending on your judgment.

DFK at that point.

The Answer:

Yep, it’s a Push, plain and simple.  The player from the offense used the defender to launch off of.  Similar to if another player pushed off an opponent on a header (which would be holding, since they are holding the player down)

So, Direct Free Kick to Team A, since this is a foul, not misconduct.

The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog – Volume 10 Issue 10 – A Little Help From My Opponent

March 11, 2018

The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog

Sharpening Referee Knowledge and Judgment, One Week at a Time

Volume 10, Issue 10, March 11, 2018

Forward this to a Fellow Soccer Ref!

Please feel free to forward this Blog to your fellow soccer officials or tell them about it.

The purpose of this Blog is so we can all learn from each other’s experience and by doing so, avoid mistakes, make more consistent calls, and do a better job. I don’t have to make any of this up – this is what happens on the pitch.

Quote of the Week

“The mother of a 14 year old replied that her son “intents” to ONLY (my caps), “line referee” so does he need to take the online Laws of the Game portion?”

From an instructor who received a question about taking the Laws of the Game electronic class prior to the class.

Because everyone knows, the “line referee” doesn’t call anything….OMG!

It’s Game Time!

The Spring Soccer Season is starting in Illinois.

Are you ready to hit the pitch and look good?  If not, get ready!

This Week’s Question – A Little Help from My Opponent

During a recent game…

This is in the early minutes of a very fast paced game between two skilled teams.  You see B25 at mid-field, near A14 when the ball gets kicked towards Team A’s goal by another player, half a field away.

You see B25 launch off of A14 using his arms and go after the ball, leaving A14 on the ground afterwards.

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What is the restart?

Last Week’s Question – Double-Caution Mess

During a recent game…

Play has been bouncing all over the field, with no team having a definitive advantage, and with both trying to score points.

B11 has just gained possession of the ball, and is going like a laser out of his end, near the west touchline.  A5 closes in fast pursuit, coming up to the side of B11 and executing a legal charge for the ball.

A5’s legal charge moves into a push, and both A5 and B11 crash to the ground.

You whistle the foul and plan to Caution A5, since he has had several fouls, and a pattern is present.  As you move in, B11 directs some dissenting words towards you with regards to the call.

You show the Caution to A5 for Persistent Infringement, and then B11 for Dissent.

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What is the restart?

What You Said:

Referee 1:

OK, referee handled the situation as best he/she could at the time. If this were the first elevation of tempers, he/she is probably doing a good job of controlling the match. So, you already gave us the call and corresponding cards.

Restart is DFK for team B at spot of push as I’m punishing the foul (push) and not the misconduct (dissent).

Referee 2:

Cards for everyone, and depending on the type of language used by B11, yellow or red.

Restart with a DFK as the foul is the point of contention.

Referee 3:

Hmmmm …. if I’m carding B11 – the player being fouled – for dissent, then B11 must have said something very interesting – or I’ve already allowed one or both teams “chew” on my ear too much in this game ….

Call – Pushing …. Restart – DFK to team B

Referee 4:

The call during play would be the original foul, against A5 for the push; which if he had been warned about this previously can be for persistent infringement; yellow card. Then before play is restarted a yellow card can be issued to B11 for dissent.

Restart would be a DFK for B11’s team at the spot of the foul.

Referee 5:

You whistled for the foul; game is “stopped” at that point for that particular foul, and anything subsequently from the whistling for the foul to the restart for that particular foul is considered nothing or misconduct.

Issue the caution to Player A5; a few words or chew the arse of Player B11 if sufficient for game and player management or caution that Player as well.

The restart does not change: you stopped it for foul(s) by Player A5, so when you last stopped giving advantage, the restart is from that point either DFK if outside A’s penalty area, or PK against A’s team if within area.

In summary, if the game is stopped for a foul, or kick-off/throw-in/corner/goal kick/drop ball, the restart is not changed because of any event between the whistle/reason for a restart and the restarting of the game.

Referee 6:

Play stopped when you decided to blow the whistle for A’s foul. No resulting actions change the restart. Book the 2 individuals, DFK for B.

Referee 7:

So you have two cautions, one for the aggressive move and one for dissent. First, calm everyone down. You need to make sure you have the game under control. Remind B11 that you saw AND CALLED the foul, the dissent was not necessary but caution non-the-less. Better than even chance the coach will take the hint and ask to pull B11 from the field to allow them to cool off.

The restart is based on the first foul. The dissent happened after the whistle was blown, thus the ball was out of play.

DFK for team B.

Referee 8:

Since A5’s push happened first, restart with a DFK for Team B.

Like the fish, too bad B11 couldn’t keep his mouth shut.

Referee 9:

The call during play would be the original foul, against A5 for the push; which if he had been warned about this previously can be for persistent infringement; yellow card. Then before play is restarted a yellow card can be issued to B11 for dissent. Restart would be a DFK for B11’s team at the spot of the foul.

The Answer:

What was the first Restart?

Pushing – along with a Caution for Persistent Infringement – Direct Free Kick.

Remember – NOTHING changes the restart, so while the idiot comments made by B11, while worthy of a Caution at the same time, does not usurp that Caution and Direct Free Kick Restart.

So, remember, Nothing Changes the Restart!

The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog – Volume 10 Issue 9 – Double Caution Mess

March 4, 2018

The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog

Sharpening Referee Knowledge and Judgment, One Week at a Time

Volume 10, Issue 9, March 4, 2018

Forward this to a Fellow Soccer Ref!

Please feel free to forward this Blog to your fellow soccer officials or tell them about it.

The purpose of this Blog is so we can all learn from each other’s experience and by doing so, avoid mistakes, make more consistent calls, and do a better job. I don’t have to make any of this up – this is what happens on the pitch.

Quote of the Week

“He lost control of the game.”

From a Clinician at a recent clinic, showing a State Final game where the Center was in over his head, and lost control of a game.

How Can This Happen?  How can someone be selected for State Finals who doesn’t even run regularly?  Who rates these officials and gets them into this position?

1 Week to Go!

The Spring Soccer Season starts in a week in Illinois.  My schedule is absolutely packed with High School games – the assignors are working overtime, and I’m still getting games.

Now I’m starting to get assignments for the fall season.  It’s going to be a challenging year to cover all the games with the lack of any defined effort to recruit officials in either High School or Competitive Soccer.

Take a moment and look over your gear.  Are those shoes shot?  Are your shorts faded to brown?  Is the elastic on your socks shot?  Can you find your patch?

Remember, 50% of the coaches impression of us is how we look when we hit the field.  Don’t start your first games at a deficit – check your gear, and replace gear that is worn out!

This Week’s Question – Double-Caution Mess

During a recent game…

Play has been bouncing all over the field, with no team having a definitive advantage, and with both trying to score points.

B11 has just gained possession of the ball, and is going like a laser out of his end, near the west touchline.  A5 closes in fast pursuit, coming up to the side of B11 and executing a legal charge for the ball.

A5’s legal charge moves into a push, and both A5 and B11 crash to the ground.

You whistle the foul and plan to Caution A5, since he has had several fouls, and a pattern is present.  As you move in, B11 directs some dissenting words towards you with regards to the call.

You show the Caution to A5 for Persistent Infringement, and then B11 for Dissent.

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What is the restart?

Last Week’s Question – Klingon!

During a recent game…

You see B12 challenging A3 for the ball, with A3 close to the Team B Penalty Area.  B12 suddenly gets grabby – first A3’s arm, which they shrug off, then a grab at their jersey, which you see balloon out as A3 pulls away, and then again on A3’s shorts as A3 continues to try to break free.

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What is the restart?

What You Said:

Referee 1:

For me, on the arm grab, I would wait a couple seconds to see if A3 broke away to get an advantage out of it. If not I would call the first grab of the arm. If advantage had been applied on the arm grab, then I definitely am going to call the jersey pull along with a yellow card on B12. There would not be a “shorts grab” as I would not have let it get this far.

Assuming it did not occur in the penalty area (your question included “close to the Team B Penalty Area” the restart is a DFK for team A at the spot of the first (arm grab) or second (jersey pull) infraction, depending on whether advantage materialized or not.

Referee 2:

Assuming the attack has been disrupted and there’s no longer any advantage to be gained by Team A, then it’s clearly holding. Result = DFK. If it is in the Penalty Area it’s a Penalty Kick; outside it’s a DFK.

Possible Yellow Card for a tactical foul.

Referee 3:

If I feel there is an advantage, I’m going to allow play to continue. At the next stoppage, I’m carding.

If I decide that no advantage exists at the last point of the hold, I’m blowing the play dead and carding.

This could be one where you need to use your best judgment of the players’ skill level.

Referee 4:

This is holding. You have given A3 a chance to continue playing, you may have even called “ADVATAGE” but since the holding has only gotten worse it’s time to blow the whistle. Now the question is where the restart will occur. The foul sounds like it started outside the penalty area and may have continued in. You will need to bring the ball back to the point where the foul began (outside the penalty area.)

Restart with DFK for team A.

The Answer:

This is likely to boil over unless you take firm action – now.  You have a clear case of persistent infringement, and while you may be thinking “Advantage,” the Advantage isn’t materializing.

Either deal with this, or A3 will take care of it in a way (retaliation) that will likely result in a Caution.

Some would say “I thought the fouls looked (read) as trifling.”  That is fair push back.  What you have to consider is what the player is thinking – look at their face and listen for signs of frustration. Players will only take so many hacks before they hack back, and that means we have lost control of the game.

Don’t let that happen.  Pull it back, blow the whistle, have strong words with B12 or a Caution, and get the game back underway.

The restart would be a Direct Free Kick at the point of the foul.

The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog – Volume 10 Issue 8 – Klingon!

February 25, 2018

The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog

Sharpening Referee Knowledge and Judgment, One Week at a Time

Volume 10, Issue 8, February 25, 2018

Forward this to a Fellow Soccer Ref!

Please feel free to forward this Blog to your fellow soccer officials or tell them about it.

The purpose of this Blog is so we can all learn from each other’s experience and by doing so, avoid mistakes, make more consistent calls, and do a better job. I don’t have to make any of this up – this is what happens on the pitch.

Quote of the Week

“I didn’t touch him!”

From a player from the defense after the player he was guarding suddenly flew at a 90 degree angle to where he had been heading.

This Week’s Question – Klingon!

During a recent game…

You see B12 challenging A3 for the ball, with A3 close to the Team B Penalty Area.  B12 suddenly gets grabby – first A3’s arm, which they shrug off, then a grab at their jersey, which you see balloon out as A3 pulls away, and then again on A3’s shorts as A3 continues to try to break free.

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What is the restart?

Last Week’s Question – A Red Card – But Which Player?

On a recent exam…

You are watching play progress from around 10 yards away from the ball, as Player B12 moves in towards Team A’s penalty area.

As you watch B12, you see two players in the background, A4 and B8, with B8 standing behind A4 in the Team A Penalty Area.

You see A4 (nowhere near the ball) lift an elbow, and smack B8 in the face with his elbow in a savage blow.  B8 drops to the ground, holding on to his nose, which is now bleeding profusely.

You Make the Call:

What is the call?
What Card Will You Be Giving (SFP or VC)?

What is the restart?

What You Said:

Referee 1:

Looks like A4 is the only player that has committed a foul. Clearly VC. Restart at point of foul.

Referee 2:

  1. SFP has to be on the field of play, while the ball is in play, with the ball close by. This offense took place off the ball.

Restart- PK for Team B as the VC took place in the Team A Penalty Area.

Referee 3:

The act is a foul, committed against an opponent within the miscreant’s penalty area during dynamic play = textbook PK.

Send-off (red) issued for VC because it was not in the processes of dynamic play but separate from play.

Restart: PK.

Referee 4:

I’ll go with a RC for VC, since there was no playing the ball, only the crime committed. Restart with PK, since in the PA.

Referee 5:

We have a send off for A4 for VC, and as the foul occurred in the Penalty Area, it’s a Penalty Kick!

Watch for post play issues throughout the game. work with your team to cover all areas.

Referee 6:

Off the ball it’s VC to A4 for elbow. PK for team B. Team A plays down one player.

Referee 7:

A4 gets a trip to the showers. Straight red on this one.

Check with your AR to see if A4 was retaliating and the AR saw something you didn’t. If so there may be a second dismissal here.

The problem with retaliation is you rarely see what started it. Just the ending.

Now comes the ‘fun’ part: The restart. Based on the description, this occurred in the Team A penalty area. So the restart is a PK for Team B.

Referee 8:

More than likely we are all standing there thinking, “Did I really see that?”

This is a violent conduct send off, and you better move fast to get the offender away from everyone so Team B doesn’t retaliate (though you might think they are justified) and get themselves thrown out.

The Answer:

This is defined as Violent Conduct (striking another player while the ball is not in the area.  It is Not Serious Foul Play, which occurs while contesting for the ball.

So, first off, show A4 the Red Card, and send them off.

Now, you have to address the restart.  This occurred in the Penalty Area, so you’ll be running to the Penalty Mark, and pointing to get everyone on the same page.  If your AR is on the ball, they will already be in position to check whether the ball goes over the goal line.

The restart after this PK is completed is either a Kickoff, a Goal Kick, a Corner Kick, or if you have PK violations, an Indirect Free Kick where applicable.

The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog – Volume 10 Issue 7 – A Red Card – But Which Player?

February 19, 2018

The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog

Sharpening Referee Knowledge and Judgment, One Week at a Time

Volume 10, Issue 7, February 18, 2018

Forward this to a Fellow Soccer Ref!

Please feel free to forward this Blog to your fellow soccer officials or tell them about it.

The purpose of this Blog is so we can all learn from each other’s experience and by doing so, avoid mistakes, make more consistent calls, and do a better job. I don’t have to make any of this up – this is what happens on the pitch.

Quote of the Week

“He fell down!”

From a player from the defense after he was seen pulling the opponent to the ground.  In the Penalty Area.

This Week’s Question – A Red Card – But Which Player?

On a recent exam…

You are watching play progress from around 10 yards away from the ball, as Player B12 moves in towards Team A’s penalty area.

As you watch B12, you see two players in the background, A4 and B8, with B8 standing behind A4 in the Team A Penalty Area.

You see A4 (nowhere near the ball) lift an elbow, and smack B8 in the face with his elbow in a savage blow.  B8 drops to the ground, holding on to his nose, which is now bleeding profusely.

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What Card are you going to give (SFP or VC)

What is the restart?

Last Week’s Question – Who Dunnit?

On a recent game…

There is a challenge on the goal.  Defenders A12 and A20 are near the goal mouth and each other, while Keeper A00 is moving, trying to deflect the ball out from the hail of shots heading in.

B2, B7 and B13 are in the area, with B4, B9, and B22 running in.  It’s getting crowded and hard to see, so you shift your position for a wider view.

Just as you reach the new position, you see B7 make a blistering shot, right at Team A’s goal.  As the shot approaches the goal mouth, you see one of two players (either A12 or A20, as both were in white, and Goalkeeper A00 was in a really bright green jersey with long sleeves) in the goal, one of which (you can’t tell who – you saw the arm through B4, B2, B13, etc) deflects the ball out of the goal mouth.

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What is the restart?

What You Said:

Referee 1:

As in a question from a couple of weeks ago, you can’t call what you don’t see.

Unless you can identify the player, let it go, especially since this may result in an RC for DOGSO.

That’s why you’re getting the big bucks.

Referee 2:

Well since you saw it hit an arm, you will need to decide if the ball played the arm, play on, or if the arm played the ball, Penalty Kick for Team B.

If you decide that it is a Penalty Kick, it would seem a Red Card should be given for a DOGSO; however, since you’re not sure which player, it may be a hard sell therefore I would go with a yellow to the most likely offender or no card if I’m really not sure.

The Answer:

Tough One.  If you aren’t sure who did it, you’re in a fix.

So, first things first – you know who DIDN’T do it.

Take a mental snapshot of where the Team A Defenders were at.  Then quickly check with your ARs and see if anyone got eyes on who did it.

If they didn’t, pull aside the offending player who most likely did it based on their location, and issue the card.  You can go as far as to say “Someone is going to take the card for this.  If it was your teammate, speak up now, because by proximity to the play, it sure looked like you.”  If they point in the other direction, go talk to the other player and hopefully, find the miscreant.

If you can’t identify who deflected the ball out, a recent USSF clinic stated the restart is a Dropped Ball.

I think a little time sleuthing here is well-worth the justice that is due to Team B in this situation, from denying an obvious goal scoring opportunity.  And obviously, you need to change your positioning to better be able to detect this type of garbage, so you can apply the penalty as expected.  If you do have to go with a drop ball, the howling of the coach who lost the PK should help you remember in the future to move around more.

The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog – Volume 10 Issue 6 – Who Dunnit?

February 11, 2018

The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog

Sharpening Referee Knowledge and Judgment, One Week at a Time

Volume 10, Issue 6, February 11, 2018

Forward this to a Fellow Soccer Ref!

Please feel free to forward this Blog to your fellow soccer officials or tell them about it.

The purpose of this Blog is so we can all learn from each other’s experience and by doing so, avoid mistakes, make more consistent calls, and do a better job. I don’t have to make any of this up – this is what happens on the pitch.

Quote of the Week

“That was a cheap caution.”

From a color commentator on an English Premier League game, where a late tackle garnered only the ankle, not the ball.

I imagine the player who got it right in the ankle might disagree.

This Week’s Question – Who Dunnit?

On a recent game…

There is a challenge on the goal.  Defenders A12 and A20 are near the goal mouth and each other, while Keeper A00 is moving, trying to deflect the ball out from the hail of shots heading in.

B2, B7 and B13 are in the area, with B4, B9, and B22 running in.  It’s getting crowded and hard to see, so you shift your position for a wider view.

Just as you reach the new position, you see B7 make a blistering shot, right at Team A’s goal.  As the shot approaches the goal mouth, you see one of two players (either A12 or A20, as both were in white, and Goalkeeper A00 was in a really bright green jersey with long sleeves) in the goal, one of which (you can’t tell who – you saw the arm through B4, B2, B13, etc) deflects the ball out of the goal mouth.

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What is the restart?

Last Week’s Question – Offside Call – and Restart is WHERE?

On an IHSA game played under the new rules for offside…

You see player A1 cross the center line clearly in an offside position as he is running toward his opponents goal.

As the ref, you clearly see this. The ball is kicked downfield, and A1 catches up to it, just inside the penalty area.

You signal offside.

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What is the restart?

Where is the ball placed for the IFK?

What You Said:

Referee 1:

At the moment the player played the ball….just inside the penalty area. This drives the defensive players/coaches/spectators “nuts”!

I love it!

Referee 2:

For this one, the spot is where the infraction occurred. Since being in an offside position is not an infraction, then the infraction occurred when the ball was touched. Spot it just inside the PA.

The hard part here is habit-breaking for ARs. We used to be told to plant ourselves when an offside infraction is pending; now we need to continue with play all the way until we have the “interference” element.

Referee 3:

Of course he’s offside. Restart, I believe now, is where the offside player touches the ball.

The Answer:

It comes down to where the ball was played by the player.  This has become harder for the AR since it used to be when the ball was passed – if the player from the offense ran after it and started in an offside position, well, since you were even with the second to last defender, easy to call.

Now you have to bring it back to where it was touched by the offside player.  So, do the best you can remembering that (since you used to be focused on staying even with the second to last defender or the ball, whichever was closer to the goal line, now you have to look at the kicker and stay even), and issue the restart where NFHS and FIFA / USSF wants us to issue the restart.

As a side note, this type of rule change shows the lack of depth in the various Rules Committees.  On the face of it, this is supposed to make things better.  However, looking at the sharp end of the rules stick where we try to implement this kind of rule, and you can see it is very difficult.

Perhaps there are people on the committee who do know the rules and are active referees.  If this is the case, their voices are being muted by those who aren’t, under the guise of “Wouldn’t this make it more fair?”  Yes, but if it’s unenforceable, what have you just done?  It brings controversy into the game.  Making this more difficult are the words in the rules / laws, which are not clear.

It’s the same with the test questions for the Illinois High School NFHS exam.  Some had no correct answers, some could easily be seen as having more than one, depending on how you read the question.  You shouldn’t have to know the test writers and what they were thinking to answer a question!