The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog – Volume 9 Issue 46 – Shot and a Hip Check

November 19, 2017

The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog
Sharpening Referee Knowledge and Judgment, One Week at a Time
Volume 9, Issue 46, November 19, 2017

Forward this to a Fellow Soccer Ref!

Please feel free to forward this Blog to your fellow soccer officials or tell them about it.

The purpose of this Blog is so we can all learn from each other’s experience and by doing so, avoid mistakes, make more consistent calls, and do a better job. I don’t have to make any of this up – this is what happens on the pitch.

Quote of the Week

“Dribbling the ball resets the 6 second clock.”

From a goalkeeper who was called for a six second violation while dribbling the soccer ball like a basketball.  He said some high school players told him it “reset the six second clock.”  Some friends, eh?

This Week’s Question – Shot and a Hip Check

On a recent U-19 game…

It’s cold out – with temperatures hovering just above 30 degrees F.  The players are here to play though, and are trying hard.

A88 takes a great shot right at the center of Team B’s goal – the shot is on target. Just after A88 releases the ball which is a line drive towards the goal, B25 bumps A88 with her hip, causing A88 to fall to the ground.

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What is the restart?

Last Week’s Question – Dribbling Keeper

On a recent U-15 game…

This is a tournament game, and both teams have the same general skill level.  There is a shot on Team A’s goal, and you see Team A’s Keeper A00, collect the ball, and then walk to the edge of the penalty area, while dribbling the ball like a basketball.

You are silently counting to 6, and you get there and warn he is out of time.

A00 keeps dribbling the ball like a basketball.

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What is the restart?

What You Said:

Referee 1:

Award an IFK to team B where the keeper had possession of the ball. Pretty easy for me. Not sure why so many referees are afraid to enforce this.

Referee 2:

Well, based upon what I’m seeing, looks like an Indirect Free Kick…and lets have a yellow card!

Referee 3:

Handling the ball beyond 6 seconds is an IFK foul.. It sounds like the keeper is outside the GA but inside the PA. IFK from the spot where the keeper is.

You warned him/her.

I usually start counting down slowly and silently when the keeper gains clear possession and the attackers are fleeing. At 1 I shout “lose it!” If they don’t, the whistle is blown.

Referee 4:

You’ve warned the keeper. Blow the whistle, this is delay of game. If necessary caution the keeper. Restart is a DFK for team B.

The Answer:

The rules are consistent here, whether USSF, NFHS, or NCAA.  The keeper has six seconds from the point they take possession to release the ball.

Most referees will warn a goalkeeper on their first violation with “watch the time” so the keeper knows they need to be more careful.

In this case, the goalkeeper had been misinformed by some friendly high school players, who informed him that dribbling the ball “reset the clock.”

The restart is an indirect free kick at the point of the foul to the opponent, which would be Team B in this case.

By the way, this was the last time the Keeper pulled this stunt in the game.

Advertisements

The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog – Volume 9 Issue 45 – Dribbling Keeper

November 12, 2017

The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog
Sharpening Referee Knowledge and Judgment, One Week at a Time
Volume 9, Issue 45, November 12, 2017

Forward this to a Fellow Soccer Ref!

Please feel free to forward this Blog to your fellow soccer officials or tell them about it.

The purpose of this Blog is so we can all learn from each other’s experience and by doing so, avoid mistakes, make more consistent calls, and do a better job. I don’t have to make any of this up – this is what happens on the pitch.

Quote of the Week

“That’s not a foul! The ball was still touching the grass!”

From the coach of an attacking player who kicked the ball out of the goalkeeper’s hand who was laying on the ground with his hand on the ball after making a save.

Where DO they get these wacky ideas?

This Week’s Question – Dribbling Keeper

On a recent U-15 game…

This is a tournament game, and both teams have the same general skill level.  There is a shot on Team A’s goal, and you see Team A’s Keeper A00, collect the ball, and then walk to the edge of the penalty area, while dribbling the ball like a basketball.

You are silently counting to 6, and you get there and warn he is out of time.

A00 keeps dribbling the ball like a basketball.

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What is the restart?

Last Week’s Question – A Question of Age

On a recent U-15 game…

This is a tournament game, and both teams have the same general skill level.  Except for B2.  When you see B2 play, they play with a higher skill level, and look visibly older.

Compounding this is there are two B2 players.  The older looking B2 player has the same color jersey, but a different style.  Since the players were checked in as they arrived at the tournament, you have no roster or passes to look at to try to figure out what is going on.

It’s now 10 minutes into the first half, and you see B2 (the older B2) score.

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What is the restart?

What You Said:

Referee 1:

There’s nothing you can do if you aren’t responsible for checking the teams in. If the opposing team has an issue, they need to take it up with the tournament people.

Referee 2:

This is one of the main reasons I’ve quit club soccer – all the player/roster responsibilities beyond being the referee.

Goal – kickoff from center.

Referee 3:

The tournament allowed the players to play, so just keep good records. “Red/stripes” or “red/solid”.

Referee 4:

For this game, there is nothing you can do. You could write it up in a game report; however it’s like giving a player a red card and you see them in the next game.

It’s administrative.

Referee 5:

You can’t be serious asking this question.

Referee 6:

One is this:  a tournament with field marshals has undertaken the check-in process of coaches and players.

Unless or until a field marshal has not done her/his job at all, by what authority would you think you could question, let alone overrule an eligibility issue? Very dangerous grounds… very dangerous.  You do not have the resources of knowing a good from a forged pass….you do not know if it is a valid pass or not… the tournament is responsible for all of that, and not you…. so if there is no trouble facing you directly, do not insert yourself into making an issue.

If a coach has an issue with a particular player, direct that coach to the tournament powers-that-be, first to marshal, and then as that coach and marshal deem.

Let me ask you this as an official…. you have a U9 girls’ game… one payer  has a woman’s developed form… are YOU going to initiate an inquiry when that player has been deemed eligible by the tournament… yes, I chose this example to hammer home the issue and added even more sensitive societal concerns.  (OH, and do you know about pre-mature puberty?)

Just as girls could exhibit having women’s forms early in life, you can have males at same age look like 8 or look 25 (accelerated puberty issue)   when playing at U15.

What happens if it is the “young-looking” player who in fact is the elder (an example of sexual delayed puberty possible in this vein), and as seen in the 10-minutes of game (your scenario that you posited on this issue of looking older) to be the superior player/athlete, controlling the ball and game…. will someone challenge the “young-looking” or only is the illusion of age ever challenged? (This idea from another astute referee, and I agree is also a great assessment of the issue from the converse angle.)

If the marshal did her/his job, then let… it…be.  My humble thoughts (and anonymous credit for the younger-looking player issues goes to whom knows that gave me that thought.)

Referee 7:

This is a tournament. You don’t check in teams, the tournament does, it is their responsibility, not yours. If you have concerns, take notes and bring them to the tournament management, it’s their problem.

The Answer:

Know the tournament Rules. In general, unless you are the Tournament Official (e.g., the one who keeps the rules straight for the Tournament Director), your job as an official in such a situation is to notify the Tournament Director / Official so they can figure this out.

If you have someone playing down improperly, that can result in all those team’s wins being nullified.

The team had plenty of subs by the way.

I actually had this happen on a tournament some years ago, and the Tournament Director went and asked the kid who was playing on a U12 Team how old he was.  The player replied without hesitation “I’m 14.”

It got ugly from there.  The parent who raised this issue of improper age (who had a kid on an opponent’s team that also made the playoffs) had watched the “too old” kid play all day the previous day, and only mentioned it when his team made it to the playoffs on Sunday.  After consulting with me (the Tournament Rules Administrator) on the SAY Rules, the Tournament Director told the team they could play, but were out of the tournament winnings (couldn’t place) and that the “too old” player couldn’t play.  The team said if that player couldn’t play, they wouldn’t play.

The Tournament Director ruled correctly, the too old player couldn’t play.  The team packed up and left; and one team got a buy in the tournament bracket as a result.

So, if you see something like this, notify your Tournament Director as soon as you see it.  Have their phone number in your cel.  Remember, it isn’t your fault that they tried to cheat the tournament.  Make the call.

After this incident for all MSA’s tournaments, the parents of the player had to bring their kid’s birth certificate to the first day, and only players verified and checked in on the roster were allowed to play during the tournament.

It’s not hard to follow the rules.  It’s our job to enforce the rules.  As respondents noted, it’s the Tournament Director’s job to make sure the players are checked in.  With that said, there is nobody watching after check in, so someone could sneak in.  Our job is to keep the game safe, enjoyable and equitable (e.g., fair).  So, make the call.  The worst think that happens is that the Tournament Director says “We know” or “We’ll come take a look.”  In either case, you have done your job.

To those who would imply peril from making such a call, I would say they need to think a bit more.  The difference in uniform is something that is applicable.  So, if you see it, say something.  Nothing said – means allowing something that could be improper.  And that my fellow officials, isn’t our way.

The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog – Volume 9 – Issue 44 – A Question of Age

November 5, 2017

The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog
Sharpening Referee Knowledge and Judgment, One Week at a Time
Volume 9, Issue 44, November 5, 2017

Forward this to a Fellow Soccer Ref!

Please feel free to forward this Blog to your fellow soccer officials or tell them about it.

The purpose of this Blog is so we can all learn from each other’s experience and by doing so, avoid mistakes, make more consistent calls, and do a better job. I don’t have to make any of this up – this is what happens on the pitch.

Quote of the Week

“Call it both ways, Ref!”

From a coach, when his team was fouling the other team, and the other team wasn’t fouling his team.

This Week’s Question – A Question of Age

On a recent U-15 game…

This is a tournament game, and both teams have the same general skill level.  Except for B2.  When you see B2 play, they play with a higher skill level, and look visibly older.

Compounding this is there are two B2 players.  The older looking B2 player has the same color jersey, but a different style.  Since the players were checked in as they arrived at the tournament, you have no roster or passes to look at to try to figure out what is going on.

It’s now 10 minutes into the first half, and you see B2 (the older B2) score.

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What is the restart?

Last Week’s Question – Duh!

On a recent U-19 game…

This is a tournament game, and both teams have come to play.  Team A has the advantage, with a few faster players, while Team B has less good players.  Both teams are playing their best.

There is an obvious foul called against Team B.  B18 kicks the ball away 20 feet in frustration after the whistle.

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What is the restart?

What You Said:

Referee 1:

For me, it depends on the level I’m doing.

You could caution immediately, however; why card someone when perhaps it was just one of those “moments.”

Definitely stop the clock, if they have been warned then caution.

No coach wants one of their players carded for this (heads up coaches) and by stopping the clock you can send a message to everyone.

Referee 2:

Yellow Card to B18 for delaying the restart. DFK to Team A.

Referee 3:

I have a very low tolerance for this kind of behavior. First, B18 is dissenting by action which you can not allow to continue and second kicking the ball away is a delay of game.

Blow the whistle again, and issue a Caution to B18 for (pick your poison: Delay of game or dissent.) Make sure everyone understands this behavior is not acceptable. There is no change to the restart: Team A has whatever restart was called after the ‘obvious foul’

The Answer:

Delaying the Restart – when a player kicks the ball away, they prevent a quick restart.

If you look at the old Advice to Referees, it advocated that a Caution is warranted for such callous play which takes away the fun and excitement of soccer.  This is still on the 7 Cautionable Offense sheets that are sometimes handed out at USSF clinics.

Sp. Caution to B18 for Delaying the Restart.  Nothing changes the Direct Free Kick restart in this case, which continues once the ball is retrieved.

As to the comment that “no coach wants their player cautioned for this,” if that were true, they should train their players not to do this, or to Fail to Respect the Distance.  Yet, they still do it.  So, Coach – heal thyself – stop training people to see if the referee will Caution an Cautionable Offense.

Referees: Stop this garbage play.  Reward it with the card it so richly deserves.  Trust me – it will be the last time someone does that in a game.

Exception: You see the player with the leg moving towards the ball BEFORE you whistle.  Otherwise, Card em!

The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog – Volume 9 Issue 43 – Duh!

October 29, 2017

The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog
Sharpening Referee Knowledge and Judgment, One Week at a Time
Volume 9, Issue 43, October 29, 2017

Forward this to a Fellow Soccer Ref!

Please feel free to forward this Blog to your fellow soccer officials or tell them about it.

The purpose of this Blog is so we can all learn from each other’s experience and by doing so, avoid mistakes, make more consistent calls, and do a better job. I don’t have to make any of this up – this is what happens on the pitch.

Quote of the Week

“The officials on that High school soccer game were terrible.”

From a parent, who complained about referees on a High School Regional Championship game.  Her son was a referee for one whole year.

This Week’s Question – Duh!

On a recent U-19 game…

This is a tournament game, and both teams have come to play.  Team A has the advantage, with a few faster players, while Team B has less good players.  Both teams are playing their best.

There is an obvious foul called against Team B.  B18 kicks the ball away 20 feet in frustration after the whistle.

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What is the restart?

Last Week’s Question – A Quick Hand

On a recent U-19 game…

This is a tournament game, and both teams have come to play.  Team A has the advantage, with a few faster players, while Team B has less good players.  Both teams are playing their best.

There is an attack on Team B’s goal, with multiple Team A players taking shots on goal, being rebounded by Keeper B00, and then back to another Team A player, who shoots.  Repeat.

During this time, you see B3 in the goal mouth, and a shot comes in fast.  B3 (who is not the goalkeeper) uses her hand to deflect the ball out of the goal, deflecting out what would have otherwise been a goal.

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What is the restart?

What You Said:

Referee 1:

We have a PK, along with a send off!

Referee 2:

This one is too easy. B3 gets to go to the mall earlier than planned. DOGSO, red card to B3, penalty kick.

Referee 3:

Right out of the rulebook: a classic DOG SO. Red card to defender handling the shot and restart is a PK.

Referee 4:

Pretty straight forward. Sounds like a PK and a RC, since the shot was on goal.

Referee 5:

Easy One: Red card B3 and a PK to Team A.

Referee 6:

Goal scoring opportunity prevented by a handball in the box is a PK. Red card to B3.

Referee 7:

According to a revision to the LOG made a few years ago this is DOGSO with a double whammy. Player B3 gets a ‘straight red’ dismissal and team A gets a PK.

The Answer:

Well, Rec U19 or not, that’s a Red Card.

Denial of an Obvious Goal Scoring Opportunity (DOGSO) by Handling.  B3 is right in the goal mouth so there nothing to question here.  Even the coach understood.

The player said it was instinctive.  So was the card.

So, Red Card to B3, Team B plays short.  Penalty Kick to Team A.

The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog – Volume 9 Issue 42 – A Quick Hand!

October 23, 2017

The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog

Sharpening Referee Knowledge and Judgment, One Week at a Time

Volume 9, Issue 42, October 22, 2017

Forward this to a Fellow Soccer Ref!

Please feel free to forward this Blog to your fellow soccer officials or tell them about it.

The purpose of this Blog is so we can all learn from each other’s experience and by doing so, avoid mistakes, make more consistent calls, and do a better job. I don’t have to make any of this up – this is what happens on the pitch.

Quote of the Week

“That official is terrible.”

From a parent, who complained about someone who is a professional sports team owner, who comes out and refs AYSO games.  Talk about ungrateful.

This Week’s Question – A Quick Hand

On a recent U-19 game…

This is a tournament game, and both teams have come to play.  Team A has the advantage, with a few faster players, while Team B has less good players.  Both teams are playing their best.

There is an attack on Team B’s goal, with multiple Team A players taking shots on goal, being rebounded by Keeper B00, and then back to another Team A player, who shoots.  Repeat.

During this time, you see B3 in the goal mouth, and a shot comes in fast.  B3 (who is not the goalkeeper) uses her hand to deflect the ball out of the goal, deflecting out what would have otherwise been a goal.

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What is the restart?

Last Week’s Question – Tacky Tackle

On a recent U-19 game…

Play between the two U-19 teams has been just above Rec Plus.  Some minor fouls, some passes.

You see B14 with the ball, moving towards the mid line on their way to attack their opponent’s goal.

Just as B14 is crossing the mid field line, you see A2 come in with a tackle.  As A2 comes in, they get leg first, then ball.  B14 tumbles to the ground, and A2 takes the ball forward.

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What is the restart?

What You Said:

Referee 1:

Tripping on A2. In such a low level game, perhaps not even worth a card.

Referee 2:

Most likely this calls for a caution…I’m not prone to allow tackles into legs.

Restart with a DFK.

Referee 3

Such a boring question this week 🙂

Foul – Direct kick to team B.

Referee 4:

A2 has committed an illegal charge. Blow the whistle. The game is ‘just above rec’ so this may not need to be a caution but in a more serious game or if this is not the first time a caution would calm things down. DFK for team B from the spot of the foul.

The Answer:

Yep, it’s boring. But it’s a call that needed to be made.

The challenge was reasonable, but could have been timed better.  Perhaps a second earlier – who can tell?

However, since Leg was knocked akimbo before the ball was contacted, a Direct Free Kick is warranted in this case to Team B, at the spot of the infraction.

The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog – Volume 9 Issue 41 – Tacky Tackle

October 15, 2017

The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog

Sharpening Referee Knowledge and Judgment, One Week at a Time

Volume 9, Issue 41, October 14, 2017

Forward this to a Fellow Soccer Ref!

Please feel free to forward this Blog to your fellow soccer officials or tell them about it.

The purpose of this Blog is so we can all learn from each other’s experience and by doing so, avoid mistakes, make more consistent calls, and do a better job. I don’t have to make any of this up – this is what happens on the pitch.

Quote of the Week

“I knew driving down here these were the types of referee’s we were going to get”!

From a coach who tried to argue that a referee shouldn’t of yellow carded his player after the player said to an opponent “come over here and try that and see what you will get!”  You have to admire that kind of chutzpah.

This Week’s Question – Tacky Tackle

On a recent U-19 game…

Play between the two U-19 teams has been just above Rec Plus.  Some minor fouls, some passes.

You see B14 with the ball, moving towards the mid line on their way to attack their opponent’s goal.

Just as B14 is crossing the mid field line, you see A2 come in with a tackle.  As A2 comes in, they get leg first, then ball.  B14 tumbles to the ground, and A2 takes the ball forward.

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What is the restart?

Last Week’s Question – Flying Keepers and Knees

On a recent professional level game…

Note: I know this is pro-level stuff. With that said, this is something that we, as referees need to talk about, because it is happening to some extent at lower levels.

Here is the video link: (Not for those with a weak stomach)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UXojbLUUM8Y

In this case, we have Wolfsburg goalkeeper (Koen Casteels) smashing his knee into the face of Vfb Stuttgart Captain Christian Gentner during a save.  He came 12 yards off the goal line to make this save.

A physician recognized the risk to the player, and ran onto the field, saving the player’s life.

Injuries included fractured eye sockets, a broken nose, a fractured upper jaw, and a severe concussion.

What would you do with this one?

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What is the restart?

What You Said:

Referee 1:

Interesting scenario…

The goalie’s eye’s were on the ball all the way yet leading with the knee isn’t a smart move.

Some may say that’s how he got his momentum.

Just taking a stab at this, I would say a foul against the keep, PK and a card (most likely red if at the lower levels).

Referee 2:

I have always disagreed with coaches who teach the keeper to jump with a knee raised. This is a way to intimidate the opponents and it works. If any other player had jumped at an opponent like this it would be at the very least a caution.

Contact made is an automatic dismissal for striking an opponent. Why should the keeper be any different?

I had a similar case a couple years back with a very tall keeper jumping and kicking a much shorter attacker in the ear. I went straight red. There is no place in our sport for this to be protected behavior.

If this happens to me I would ignore the protestations of the coach that ‘he was just going for the ball’ which is patently false. Straight dismissal and PK.

The Answer:

Keeper or not, Red Card and Out.

This is simply appalling.  It isn’t appropriate.

I’ve personally warned a keeper in Illinois on a High School game, who kept leading with his knee at every save.  That stopped the behavior.

This isn’t “protecting themselves.”  This is a callous, brazen attack on another player.  It’s criminal.  And it must be punished.

That the upper league referees would look past this is just appalling.  Where would this ever be within the spirit of the game?

Perhaps this is an analog of what is happening to American Football in some respects (you know, the one where most players use their hands to play the ball?)

There was a quote from an older player, looking at the injuries of the modern sport.  They mentioned that they played with the same spirit, but back in the day, they didn’t have 350 lb lineman who could sprint 40 yards in 3 seconds.

The strength and agility of players is moving up.  Their skills have to follow.  This could have easily been a fatality.  It may be career ending for the injured player.

Let’s work together and put an end to this foul play.  They Keeper doesn’t have any special powers or abilities to commit this type of heinous act.

The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog – Volume 9 Issue 40 – Flying Keepers and Knees

October 8, 2017

The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog

Sharpening Referee Knowledge and Judgment, One Week at a Time

Volume 9, Issue 40, October 8, 2017

Forward this to a Fellow Soccer Ref!

Please feel free to forward this Blog to your fellow soccer officials or tell them about it.

The purpose of this Blog is so we can all learn from each other’s experience and by doing so, avoid mistakes, make more consistent calls, and do a better job. I don’t have to make any of this up – this is what happens on the pitch.

Quote of the Week

“In my 45 years of soccer, I’ve never seen that carded!”

From a high school coach at a game, after a player was carded for a 2 handed hold on an opponent.

Perhaps all of that was in Rec, or with armless people?

This Week’s Question – Flying Keepers and Knees

On a recent professional level game…

Note: I know this is pro-level stuff. With that said, this is something that we, as referees need to talk about, because it is happening to some extent at lower levels.

Here is the video link: (Not for those with a weak stomach)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4CkcLHnGmPA

In this case, we have Wolfsburg goalkeeper (Koen Casteels) smashing his knee into the face of Vfb Stuttgart Captain Christian Gentner during a save.  He came 12 yards off the goal line to make this save.

A physician recognized the risk to the player, and ran onto the field, saving the player’s life.

Injuries included fractured eye sockets, a broken nose, a fractured upper jaw, and a severe concussion.

What would you do with this one?

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What is the restart?

Last Week’s Question – Kicked and Surprise! – Trapped

On a recent high school game…

The mixer in Team A’s Penalty Area is getting a lot of action.  The ball has literally been shot at the goal, deflected by the Team A Keeper out to Player B11, who took another shot which hit the goal post, which deflected to onside Player B13, who took another shot.

This shot headed right for Player A23 (not the goalkeeper), and literally got the ball stuck between A23’s left arm and A23’s torso.

The ball stays there for several seconds.  A23 is in the Team A Penalty Area.

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What is the restart?

What You Said:

Referee 1:

Personal story – this similar fact situation happened to me in a Sectional Finals game between two highly ranked teams.

The defender in fact was in the goal area, less than a yard from the goal line and between the upright goal posts when the shot was taken, and the ball wedged.

The ball therefore was stopped from entering the goal.

A highly respected (spectator) coach said he would have called it a PK when I asked him how he would have handled the issue in an casual and “unofficial” post game evaluation… as said he was a highly respected coach by peers and officials.…

What I did, and my reasoning – and to this day have not been able to find a single definitive answer, but have received suggestions covering the full gambit – no foul, IFK, PK….

I called an IFK for “withholding the ball from play” and restarted with the IFK on the goal area/6 yd line closest to the spot the ball was wedged.

My reasoning:

  1. a) handling? no why: 1) natural arm position; no intent to make body bigger; literally point blank (shot was taken less than 3 yards from defender); and defender literally froze
  2. b) was the ball immediately dropped by gravity back into play? no ,,, because was wedged; shock froze the player who would normally have immediately raised his (in this case) arms and let ball drop, and ball remained for several seconds.
  3. c) so by virtue the ball was “withheld/kept from play by the body of a defender/opponent,” I likened it to when a player will fall around a ball on the ground so that no one else can play it without serious risk of kicking and so play “freezes”.

Are there counter-points, sure – well, the defender changed from accident/no foul to “deliberate ‘holding’ the ball with his arm” by the delay of several seconds.

Fortunately I was within 4 yards of that defender and I saw the utter shock, and freeze in body and eyes, so did not read any indication of changing from ‘oops to ahhh, I will stop play deliberately’

Thus, I went with equity, or at least as I thought was appropriate under these circumstances/events.

Referee 2:

Unless you are working an upper-level game or pro, whenever there is a potential handball situation the first thing you have to ask yourself is: Did the ball hit the hand or the hand hit the ball. A23 (not the GK) was initially hit on the hand by the ball. The problem is the ball is trapped between the arm and the body for a period of time so A23 effectively held the ball. Since this was in the penalty area, PK for team B. (Sorry coach: ‘He didn’t mean it is no defense here.)

Referee 3:

Looks like PK!

Now you have to decide if it’s a yellow/red card or no card, depending on the criteria you just saw.

The Answer:

So, we have a player from the Defense, who has his arm on the ball.

Handling, right?  Even the coach said “Well, I can’t argue that call.”

It’s in the Penalty area, and it’s one of the fouls that results in a Penalty Kick, so PK to Team B.

And some ribbing for A23 by his team mates at some point in the near future.

Yes, as one referee indicated, you could call it an Indirect Free Kick.  However, we can’t read minds, or intent.  We can only judge by what we see.

If this was U8, or maybe U10 rec, sure.  High School?  Nope.

The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog – Volume 9 Issue 39 – Kicked and Surprise! Trapped!

October 1, 2017

The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog

Sharpening Referee Knowledge and Judgment, One Week at a Time

Volume 9, Issue 39, October 1, 2017

Forward this to a Fellow Soccer Ref!

Please feel free to forward this Blog to your fellow soccer officials or tell them about it.

The purpose of this Blog is so we can all learn from each other’s experience and by doing so, avoid mistakes, make more consistent calls, and do a better job. I don’t have to make any of this up – this is what happens on the pitch.

Quote of the Week

“That’s WAY MORE than 10 yards!”

From a high school player at a game, when a penalty was called at the top of the penalty arc, and the referee backed them up to the PK mark.

You can’t make this stuff up.  Thanks to everyone who has been submitting good quotes by the way – don’t forget, you can submit perplexing situations as well.

The Last Few Weeks….

Have been full of wacky quotes and actions. This will be an easy year to wrap up.

I’m not saying don’t submit – I’ll take what you have.  It’s just been so rich this fall.

This Week’s Question – Kicked and Surprise! – Trapped

On a recent high school game…

The mixer in Team A’s Penalty Area is getting a lot of action.  The ball has literally been shot at the goal, deflected by the Team A Keeper out to Player B11, who took another shot which hit the goal post, which deflected to onside Player B13, who took another shot.

This shot headed right for Player A23 (not the goalkeeper), and literally got the ball stuck between A23’s left arm and A23’s torso.

The ball stays there for several seconds.  A23 is in the Team A Penalty Area.

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What is the restart?

Last Week’s Question – Keeper’s Reach

On a recent high school game…

There is a shot from Team B heading into the end.  The goalkeeper makes a run for the ball, but a random deflection sends the ball past the goalkeeper inside the penalty area.

The goalkeeper, who is outside of the penalty area, makes a diving grab.  The keeper grabs the ball (inside the penalty area) from outside the penalty area except for his hands on the ball.

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What is the restart?

What You Said:

Referee 1:

No call. The keeper’s hands are handling the ball inside the penalty area which he is allowed to do. It is the position of the ball, not the position of the body connected to the hands that determines whether or not use of the hands is proper.

Referee 2:

No foul. The GK touches the ball while it is inside the Penalty Area. That’s legal, no matter where his feet are.

Referee 3:

Continue play, no foul. Keepers hands on the ball are within the keepers penalty area.

Referee 4:

I have nothing–it is the ball that counts and it is inside the box.

Referee 5:

Real simple – it is the position of the ball NOT the GK, just as a field player during the normal course of the game could be outside the touchline and be playing a ball inside the touchline and on the pitch.

Here the ball is within the penalty area – a GK, with a couple of exceptions, may handle the ball within her/his own area…. the ball is in the area, therefore, may control the ball with hands.

Referee 6:

The key here is the location of the ball. It does not matter if the body of the keeper is outside the penalty area, the ball is inside the penalty area when touched by the keeper. No call, play on.

The Answer:

This is Legal in all rules (USSF/ FIFA / NISOA / NFHS). It’s where the BALL is, not the player in this case.  Since the ball is in the Penalty Area, even if the keeper is out, they can touch the ball.

It doesn’t work the other way.  The ball is outside of the Penalty Area, and the keeper bends over and picks it up. That’s a DFK at the point of the foul.

Don’t forget – the keeper can dribbled a ball from outside the penalty area, provided it was sent by an opponent, and bring it into the penalty area and then pick it up as well.

Respectful Disagreement on Last Week’s Answer

Last week, I posed a mind-bender about a continuous foul, which started at the midfield line, and continued (unabated) into the Penalty Area.

Advantage had been given, as the player from the offense continued to make good progress.

The referee who disagreed stated that the foul should have been brought back to the point it started.

I respectfully disagree.  The governance on this is found here:

http://www.fifa.com/mm/document/afdeveloping/refereeing/law_5_the_referee_en_47411.pdf

As usual, the governance doesn’t cover this situation.  Let’s look at what it calls for:

If there is a promising attack towards goal (True in this case)

No significant injury (True in this case)

The referee should look for advantage (True in the case)

So, what is wrong?  Nothing.

This is an attempt by a player to thwart the Laws / Rules of the Game.  The foul (whether you consider pulling the arm away a foul (which it is, similar to bending over when a player is fairly charging another player, causing them to fall), or the original, continuous push) occurred in the Penalty Area at the end.  The Laws / Rules are consistent: Regardless of the location of the ball, if any of these fouls occur in the Penalty Area, a Penalty Kick shall be awarded,” is what they all say.

Clear enough?

The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog – Volume 9 Issue 38 – Keeper’s Reach

September 24, 2017

The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog

Sharpening Referee Knowledge and Judgment, One Week at a Time

Volume 9, Issue 38, September 24, 2017

Forward this to a Fellow Soccer Ref!

Please feel free to forward this Blog to your fellow soccer officials or tell them about it.

The purpose of this Blog is so we can all learn from each other’s experience and by doing so, avoid mistakes, make more consistent calls, and do a better job. I don’t have to make any of this up – this is what happens on the pitch.

Quote of the Week

“If you’re going to call that, you have to spot it the same way you did when you called that.”

From a coach at a soccer game, after an error was made by a referee in a 2 ref system, and the other referee was on his way to fix it from the far end before the restart.

This Week’s Question – Keeper’s Reach

On a recent high school game…

There is a shot from Team B heading into the end.  The goalkeeper makes a run for the ball, but a random deflection sends the ball past the goalkeeper inside the penalty area.

The goalkeeper, who is outside of the penalty area, makes a diving grab.  The keeper grabs the ball (inside the penalty area) from outside the penalty area except for his hands on the ball.

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What is the restart?

Last Week’s Question – Push Push Push Push DUMP

On a recent high school game…

During the run of play, you see Player A4 running with the ball, dribbling it towards Team B’s goal area.  You also see B19 with his arm into A4’s side, while A4 is running at an angle against his push.

This is just past the mid field line, and you call out Advantage, Play On as you see this continue.

When A4 reaches the goal area line in the Penalty area, B19 pulls his push away.  A4, who was leaning into the push now crashes to the ground in the Penalty Area before he can get a shot off.

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What is the restart?

What You Said:

Referee 1:

You have already called advantage, so be ready for complaints. The key to the effective use of the advantage call is recognizing when the advantage does not materialize. If in the 3-4 seconds after you called advantage it fails to happen, blow the whistle and call it back.

In this case, there is a pushing foul (relatively minor infraction) which you allowed to persist. When the player falls, the advantage has failed to materialize. Blow the whistle and stop play. Bring the ball out of the penalty area, back to where the push began and award a DFK.

The Answer:

This is a weird one.  You have a continuous push going into the Penalty Area, with advantage given outside the Penalty Area.  You have A4, who has been able to make progress regardless of B19’s push straight into the Penalty Area.

Needless to say, the coaches for the defense are flat to this, and can’t see this push, since it is at a 90 degree angle for the most part to their viewing.

Then, when they get to the Penalty Area, all the way to the Goal Line, the Defense drops the push, and A4, who had been leaning into it to maintain his balance against the push, crashes to the ground.

So yes, it’s a foul.  Since the foul continued into the Penalty Area where the player lost advantage, it’s a PK to Team A.  It’s also worthy of a caution for Unsporting Behavior.

There are those who would say that withdrawing the push isn’t a foul.  To them, I would answer: If it weren’t for the push, what would have happened – nothing.  So, withdrawing the push creates an intended result (offensive player loses the ball), and should be penalized as such.

The only responder noted that this started outside of the Penalty Area, so that is where the restart is.  For a normal foul (e.g., a trip, a push, something where A4 stumbled or lost their balance, then regained it, then lost it losing the advantage) that would be true.

This clearly is not a normal foul. This is a contrivance by a player to try to take advantage of the Laws / Rules of the Game.  “I stopped pushing, so no foul.”  That wouldn’t provide justice to the player who maneuvered into position for a cross against continuous opposition from the defender from nearly the mid-field line, only to have the push withdrawn at a propitious time to support the defense.

Call the PK. Yes, the coaches will (and did) scream, but they didn’t have the position to see this – you, as the Center in hot pursuit, as well as AR2, were in the position to see and penalize this.

They get more inventive every day.

The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog – Volume 9 Issue 37 – Push Push Push Push DUMP

September 17, 2017

The Weekly Soccer Referee Blog

Sharpening Referee Knowledge and Judgment, One Week at a Time

Volume 9, Issue 37, September 17, 2017

Forward this to a Fellow Soccer Ref!

Please feel free to forward this Blog to your fellow soccer officials or tell them about it.

The purpose of this Blog is so we can all learn from each other’s experience and by doing so, avoid mistakes, make more consistent calls, and do a better job. I don’t have to make any of this up – this is what happens on the pitch.

Quote of the Week

“That wasn’t dangerous play.  My player was knocked down, which is why he was playing it that way.”

From a coach at a soccer game, as his player was on the ground, within a foot of another player playing the ball, and the coach was carping about it.

This Week’s Question – Push Push Push Push DUMP

On a recent high school game…

During the run of play, you see Player A4 running with the ball, dribbling it towards Team B’s goal area.  You also see B19 with his arm into A4’s side, while A4 is running at an angle against his push.

This is just past the mid field line, and you call out Advantage, Play On as you see this continue.

When A4 reaches the goal area line in the Penalty area, B19 pulls his push away.  A4, who was leaning into the push now crashes to the ground in the Penalty Area before he can get a shot off.

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What is the restart?

Last Week’s Question – Leg Trapped

On a recent high school game…

During the run of play, you see Player A17 kick the ball from between B2’s legs.

B2 clamps his legs together around A17’s kicking leg, and basically starts hopping around, with A17 stumbling on one leg, essentially taken out of play.

You Make the Call:

What is the call?

What is the restart?

What You Said:

Referee 1:

Because the player was taken out of the play, it is not dangerous play. It has become interesting variation of holding.

Pay close attention to an advantage situation as well as retaliation from the player whose leg is being held.

If no advantage materializes, then whistle for the foul. The restart is a direct kick. PK if in the penalty area.

Depending on how long the leg-lock is in place will determine if this is just a unique foul or you need to a caution player B2. If you sense a retaliation by A17 because you gave Team A the advantage and allowed play to continue, loudly tell A17 you see the foul and will deal with it very soon.

Referee 2:

Foul, DFK for A17. Caution to B2 for USB.

Referee 3:

Kids are very imaginative – if a little zany as in this example …..

Holding by B2 – free kick to team A at the spot of the leg-lock.

Referee 4:

We have a holding foul!  DFK for A17.

Whether it’s their hands grabbing a jersey or the body, or “holding” the opponents leg with their leg, it’s still holding.

Referee 5:

That’s holding; DFK to team A. And a YC for over-doing the whole thing.

The Answer:

It’s Holding.  It’s hard to say that from the definition, but it’s definitely holding in this case, since the player is effectively taken out of play by the defender, who has trapped the player’s leg between his legs.

While he used his legs and not his hands, it’s still inappropriate, outside of the laws of the game, and needs to be penalized with a Direct Free Kick.  This could be considered Cautionable as a “professional foul” if it takes the player from the offense out of play with a goal scoring opportunity available, which isn’t the case here.

Simple misconduct – Blow the whistle, issue the Direct Free Kick to the offended team, and talk with the offender who did this – tell them it has to stop.

This is a free service.  No advertising is solicited; no “donations” are requested.